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Free Self-Guided Helsinki Walking Tour by a Finn (with Map!)

The Helsinki Central Station is the last stop on this free self-guided Helsinki walking tour.

Helsinki is quaint, laid back, severely underrated, and in many ways the microcosm of Finland. Having resided in Finland for 9 years, I fell in love with Helsinki over the course of my numerous visits to the city. A Helsinki walking tour is one of the best ways to see most of the city’s best sights, important landmarks and explore some elegant neighborhoods. This post includes a map for a self-guided free walking tour of Helsinki. Enjoy your walk! 🙂

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Why Choose This Free Self-Guided Helsinki Walking Tour?

This free self-guided Helsinki walking tour itinerary is perfect if you are short on time and trying to save some money. With our free map, you can follow the route quite easily without having to hire an expensive guide for the day.

The tour will take you past the city’s major attractions, landmark public buildings, cultural venues, charming neighborhoods, shopping streets, restaurants, and cafes. You will also see examples of modern architecture.

A particular focus of this walking tour of Helsinki lies in neighborhoods rich in some stunning Art Nouveau (or Jugendstil) architecture, areas that aren’t normally frequented by tourists.

Helsinki is a treasure trove for those who appreciate such architecture and it brings out the real flavor of the city. With more than 600 Art Nouveau buildings, Helsinki is only second to Riga in the number of Art Nouveau buildings in Europe.

Helsinki Walking Tour Itinerary

The walking tour covers a total distance of approximately 12 kilometers (7.5 miles). This walk can be rather demanding, particularly in the summer.

Depending on how fast you go, you could even make a full day of sightseeing out of it. The tour starts at the famous Karl Fazer Cafe in central Helsinki and terminates at Helsinki Central Station.

Feel free to take a break if you feel jaded along the way. I have included some cafes and restaurants in the map where you can take a breather and grab a bite. On this Helsinki walking tour, you will see:

  1. Karl Fazer Cafe
  2. National Library of Finland
  3. Senate Square
  4. Helsinki Cathedral
  5. Aleksanterinkatu
  6. Pohjola Insurance Building
  7. Mannerheimintie
  8. Kamppi Chapel of Silence
  9. Amos Rex Art Museum
  10. Mannerheim Statue
  11. Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma
  12. Finnish Parliament Building
  13. Helsinki Music Center
  14. Helsinki Central Library Oodi
  15. National Museum of Finland
  16. Finlandia Hall
  17. Rock Church
  18. Punavuori District
  19. Ullanlinna District
  20. St. John’s Cathedral
  21. Design Museum
  22. Esplanadi Park
  23. Havis Amanda
  24. Market Square
  25. Old Market Hall
  26. Helsinki City Hall
  27. Presidential Palace of Finland
  28. Old Customs House
  29. Katajanokka District
  30. Uspenski Cathedral
  31. Kruununhaka District
  32. Finnish House of Nobility
  33. Finnish National Theater
  34. Ateneum Art Museum
  35. Helsinki Central Station

1. Karl Fazer Cafe

The famous Karl Fazer Cafe is the best place to kick off this free self-guided Helsinki walking tour. C: dji Phantom 4/shutterstock.com

Kick-off your Helsinki walking tour at the renowned Karl Fazer Cafe. Fazer is an important brand in Finland and Fazer chocolates and sweets are the most popular ones in Finland.

The Karl Fazer Cafe is their flagship cafe and you can get all kinds of yummy cakes and pastries here. The coffee they serve is pretty good too. The cafe also has a section where you can pick up Fazer sweets and gifts.

Directions

Your next stop is the National Library of Finland (2). To get there, head north on Kluuvikatu, turn right onto Yliopistonkatu and turn right onto Unioninkatu. You’ll be walking a distance of 400 m.

2. National Library of Finland

The National Library of Finland is one of the must-see attractions on this free self-guided Helsinki walking tour.

The National Library of Finland may seem like an odd attraction, but the library’s main interior hall is home to Helsinki’s most mesmerizing murals and also features magnificent marble columns.

The pinnacles of the 28 marble columns are gilded with gold leaf, while the images and ornaments on the domed ceiling symbolize knowledge and learning. Best of all, it is free to enter, so quickly peek inside and snap pictures. You can check the opening hours here.

Directions

Your next stop is the Senate Square (3) which is just down the street. You’ll be walking a distance of 150 m.

3. Senate Square

The imposing Senate Square is one of the major sights on this free self-guided Helsinki walking tour. C: Dignity 100/shutterstock.com

The Senate Square has been Helsinki’s main square since the 17th century. The present square was built in 1808 by the Russians when they took charge of Finland.

The famous German architect Carl Ludvig Engel designed the square in such a manner that the buildings on its four sides of the square represented the four powers of the state as conceived at the time: senate, church, university, and commerce.

A lone statue of Tsar Alexander II stands in the center of the square. The main building of the University of Helsinki and the Government Palace (which houses the Prime Minister’s office) also lie in the square. All these buildings are fine examples of Neoclassical architecture.

Directions

Your next stop, the Helsinki Cathedral (4), is situated in the northern part of the Senate Square.

4. Helsinki Cathedral

The magnificent Helsinki Cathedral is one of the main sightseeing points of this free self-guided Helsinki walking tour.

Helsinki Cathedral is perhaps the most iconic edifice in Helsinki’s cityscape. The chalk-white, blue-domed Helsinki Cathedral dominates the Senate Square from its position above the stairs leading to it from the square. It was also designed by Carl Ludwig Engel but was only finished in 1852, 12 years after his demise.

Its exterior is graced by statues of 16th-century Protestant reformers like Martin Luther and Philipp Melanchthon, and Mikael Agricola, who translated the Bible into Finnish. Its interior is quite spartan as is customary with most Lutheran churches.

Directions

Your next stop is Aleksanterinkatu (5) which borders the south side of Senate Square. You’ll be walking a distance of 200 m.

5. Aleksanterinkatu

Aleksanterinkatu is one of the main sights on this free self-guided Helsinki walking tour. C: Popova Valeriya/shutterstock.com

Aleksanterinkatu is Helsinki’s premier commercial street that stretches from the Presidential Palace and continues to meet Mannerheimintie. Aleksanterinkatu is the city’s oldest street and is home to numerous fashionable shops, boutiques, and bars.

The street is always abuzz with activity and is a great place to observe Helsinki’s charming old trams. Aleksanterinkatu is also home to the flagship Stockmann department store which is the largest such store in the Nordic region.

Directions

Your next stop is the Pohjola Insurance Building (6) which lies at the corner of Aleksanterinkatu and Mikolankatu, opposite Handelsbanken. You’ll be walking a distance of 300 m.

6. Pohjola Insurance Building

The Pohjola Insurance Building is one of the best things to see on this free self-guided Helsinki walking tour. C: Kiev.Victor/shutterstock.com

Don’t forget to take some photos of the lovely Pohjola Insurance Building on Aleksanterinkatu. Its facade of rough-hewn soapstone and red granite is decorated with sculptures of devils, monsters, and trolls from the Kalevala, Finland’s national epic.

The Pohjola Insurance Building is one of the prime examples of the National Romantic Style of Finnish Art Nouveau.

Directions

Your next stop is Mannerheimintie (7) which meets Aleksanterinkatu if you head west. You’ll be walking a distance of 300 m.

7. Mannerheimintie

Mannerheimintie is one of the main sights to see on this free self-guided Helsinki walking tour. C: Grisha Bruev/shutterstock.com

At 5.5 km in length, Mannerheimintie is Helsinki’s longest street and most important street. It is named in honor of the Finnish military leader Carl Gustaf Mannerheim.

Mannerheimintie stretches between various neighborhoods of Helsinki and is home to many eateries, bars, and malls. It is also the location of some of the city’s most prominent buildings, cultural venues, and landmarks.

Directions

Your next stop is the Kamppi Chapel of Silence (8). To get there, head north on Mannerheimintie, turn left onto Simonkatu and turn right on a small path that leads to the Kamppi Shoppin Center. You’ll see the chapel on your left. You’ll be walking a distance of 350 m.

8. Kamppi Chapel of Silence

The Kamppi Chapel of Silence is one of the best things to see on this free self-guided Helsinki walking tour.

The Kamppi Chapel of Silence is an unusual and intriguing wooden building located in one of the city’s busiest squares. Its lustrous copper exterior and oval-shaped design make it difficult to overlook. Take a look inside even if religion isn’t your thing and you’ll notice that the chapel offers an oasis of calm from the bustling city.

The entrance to the Kamppi Chapel of Silence is free. Opening hours are Monday-Friday: 8:00 – 20:00, Saturday-Sunday: 10:00 – 18:00.

Directions

Your next stop is the Amos Rex Art Museum (9). To get there, head north on Narinkka, turn right onto Mauno Koiviston aukiou, turn left onto Lasipalatinaukio and then turn right onto Salomonkatu. You’ll be walking a distance of 150 m.

9. Amos Rex Art Museum

The Amos Rex Art Museum is one of the best things to see on this free self-guided Helsinki walking tour. C: StockphotoVideo/shutterstock.com

The Amos Rex Art Museum lies behind the famous Lasipalatsi (Glass House) building which is home to the Art Deco Rex Cinema (Bio Rex). The historic Lasipalatsi square has been metamorphosed into a surreal undulating moonscape.

A series of bulbous domes with circular windows sprout out of the ground connecting the plaza to an underground art hub, the Amos Rex Art Museum. It’s something that Stanley Kubrick would have been envious of and you can often see people of all ages scaling the five volcanic space pods posing for selfies.

Directions

Your next stop is the Mannerheim Statue (10) which can be reached by heading east on Salomonkatu and then turning left onto Mannerheimintie. You’ll be walking a distance of 300 m.

10. Mannerheim Statue

The Mannerheim Statue is one of the main sights on this free self-guided Helsinki walking tour.

The Mannerheim Statue is one of the prominent monuments you’ll encounter when walking up Mannerheimintie. Baron Carl Gustav Emil Mannerheim (1867–1951) was a political and military leader, explorer, general in the Russian Imperial Army, and President of Finland from 1944–46.

He played an undeniably large role in Finland’s military conflicts in the first half of the 20th century. Mannerheim even topped a nationwide poll of 100 Greatest Finns in 2004. The bronze statue is raised on a granite podium and shows Mannerheim on horseback.

Directions

Your next stop is the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma (11) which is just beside the Mannerheim Statue.

11. Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma

The Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma is one of the best places to see on this free self-guided Helsinki walking tour. C: Vermette108/shutterstock.com

The Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma is an impressive showcase of modern architecture. Kiasma’s curvilinear wall allows natural light from the exterior to illuminate the galleries inside during the day, while also providing a dynamic wall of light from within at night.

The shape of the building is supposed to mirror Helsinki’s geometry. Kiasma hosts mixed-media shows, art installations, contemporary drama, and art workshops.

Directions

Your next stop is the Finnish Parliament Building (12). To get there, head north on Mannerheimintie until you see the building on your left. You’ll be walking a distance of 150 m.

12. Finnish Parliament Building

The imposing Finnish Parliament Building is one of the must see attractions on this free self-guided Helsinki walking tour.

The imposing Finnish Parliament building casts a large shadow over Mannherheimintie. It opened in 1931 and its austere Neoclassicism combined with early 20th-century modernism gives it a solemn appearance.

The building’s 14 Corinthian columns and 46 steps leading up to the main entrance provide a good backdrop for photos.

Fun Fact

In 1906, Finland granted women’s suffrage and in doing so also became the first country in the world to grant women the right to stand for parliament.

Directions

Your next stop is the Helsinki Music Center (13) which lies on the opposite side of the street. You’ll be walking a distance of 50 m.

13. Helsinki Music Center

The Helsinki Music Center is one of the main sights on this free self-guided walking tour of Helsinki. C: Kiev.Victor/shutterstock.com

The Helsinki Music Center is another typically snazzy and striking piece of Finnish architecture. It is the city’s premier venue for classical music concerts. The building comprises various cuboid glass sections and is topped with a sloping grass roof.

Helsinki Music Center’s main concert hall is famed for its vineyard-style terraced seating design. The music center is also home to the renowned Sibelius Academy, where budding Finnish musicians learn their trade.

Directions

Your next stop is the Helsinki Central Library Oodi (14) which is just behind the Helsinki Music Center. Walk on Töölönlahdenkatu to get to Oodi. You’ll be walking a distance of 200 m.

14. Helsinki Central Library Oodi

Points of interest Helsinki: View of the new Oodi Library, one of the best things to explore on a Helsinki walking tour.

The brand new Oodi Central Library is the latest prominent addition to Helsinki’s cityscape. Visiting Oodi is one of the cool and exciting things to do in Helsinki and it’s not hard to see why.

The multi-million dollar library features not only books but 3D printers, recording studios, gaming rooms, a small cinema, and other leisure facilities

The best thing is that these are all free for the public to use. Due to the sweeping design of the building and its large glass structure, visitors are treated to some nice views over the city from the inside.

Directions

Your next stop is the National Museum of Finland (15). To get there, get back onto Mannerheimintie and continue north. You’ll be walking a distance of 450 m.

15. National Museum of Finland

The National Museum of Finland is one of the most famous places you'll see on this free self-guided Helsinki walking tour.

The National Museum of Finland is one of the notable points of interest on this free self-guided walking tour of Helsinki.

The museum showcases Finnish history from prehistoric times to the present era. The building dates to 1916 and is an architectural landmark being another prime example of National Romanticism in Helsinki.

It sort of resembles a Gothic church with its stonework and tower. The building is guarded by a stone bear, an important national symbol, while inside the entrance hall ceiling is decorated with scenes from Finland’s national epic, a poem known as the Kalevala.

Directions

Your next stop is the Finlandia Hall (16) which lies on the opposite side of the street. You’ll be walking a distance of 100 m.

16. Finlandia Hall

The beautiful Finlandia Hall is one of the best things to see in Helsinki on this free self-guided walking tour.

The last notable point of interest in your Helsinki walking tour itinerary on Mannerheimintie is the famous Finlandia Hall.

The Finlandia Hall hosts conferences and events, as well as a variety of music and dance performances. This angular building was designed by Alvar Aalto, Finland’s most famous architect, and is one of his most popular and celebrated creations.

Alvar Aalto was one of the most acclaimed architects of the 20th century. Many of Aalto’s designs focus on simplicity and functionality, and the Finlandia Hall is no exception.

His buildings get their aesthetic character from their dynamic relationship with their natural surroundings, unique use of materials, and smart use of lighting. Most of Aalto’s notable buildings can be found throughout Finland.

Directions

Your next stop is the Rock Church (17). To get there, head north on Mannerheimintie, turn left onto Cygnaeuksenkatu, turn left onto Töölönkatu, turn right onto Cygnaeuksenkatu. Continue straight then turn right onto Cygnaeuksenkatu, turn right onto Temppelikatu and finally turn left onto Lutherinkatu. You’ll be walking a distance of 900 m.

17. Rock Church

The stunning Rock Church is one of the must see sights to visit on this free self-guided walking tour of Helsinki.

The captivating Rock Church (Temppeliaukio Kirkko) is one of my personal favorite sites in Helsinki. This unique structure was designed by two brothers in the late 1960s is one of Finland’s most popular architectural sights. It lies underground and was carved out of a large block of granite.

The Rock Church is distinguished by its ceiling, an enormous, domed, copper disk, separated from the rough-surfaced rock walls by a ribbed ring of glass.

It is lined with 22 km of copper stripping, and light is reflected inwards from 180 skylights. The austere interior is relatively free of iconography and religious symbolism.

The entrance to the Rock Church costs 3 EUR. It is open on all days but opening hours vary, so check the website before you visit.

Directions

Your next stop is the Punavuori district (18). To get there, continue walking south on Fredrikinkatu. You’ll be walking a distance of 1.4 km.

18. Punavuori District

The trendy Punavuori district is one of the best things to see on this free self-guided Helsinki walking tour.

Punavuori is a popular district in southwestern Helsinki that has undergone gentrification and is now an upscale trendy area popular with artists, and hipsters. It is one of my favorite places in Helsinki. There is a slew of boutiques, cafes, bars, and restaurants here.

Punavuori is also home to some lovely green spaces here such as Punavuori Park. The streets of Fredrikinkatu and Bulevardi are laden with castle-like Art Nouveau-style blocks of flats with grand towers.

Directions

Your next stop is the Ullanlinna district (19). You’ll be walking a distance of 1.1 km.

19. Ullanlinna District

The Art Nouveau Ullanlinna district is one of major sightseeing attractions on this free self-guided Helsinki walking tour. C: Popova Valeriya/shutterstock.com

One of the joys of exploring central Helsinki on foot is seeing some lovely classical architecture. Ullanlinna is an affluent district in southern Helsinki that is home to some of the most sought-after properties in the city.

Numerous foreign embassies, old villa-like mansions, and upscale restaurants are located in this district. There are lots of green spaces around here such as Meripuisto and Observatory Hill Park.

Huvilakatu is one of the most impressive sights on this free self-guided Helsinki walking tour.

What really sets this neighborhood apart though, is its stunning Art Nouveau architecture. This makes it very different from the usual drab architecture found in most Finnish neighborhoods.

Make sure to stroll down Huvilakatu which is a goldmine for Art Nouveau connoisseurs. Candy-colored low-rises dot this wonderful street.

Many of them are over a century old and continue as part of an almost unbroken chain along the length of the street. The facades of the villa-like houses, their towers and balconies are creatively decorated.

Directions

Your next stop is St. John’s Church (20) which lies on Korkeavuorenkatu. You’ll be walking a distance of 1 km.

20. St. John’s Church

The wonderful St. John's Church is one of the main attractions on this free self-guided Helsinki walking tour.

The twin-spired Neo-Gothic St. John’s Church is the largest church in Helsinki. It is located on a hill and was completed in 1891 with imposing steeples and an amazing red-brick exterior. The church has wonderful acoustics and is a particular favorite for choral concerts.

Directions

Your next stop is the Design Museum (21) which lies further north on Korkeavuorenkatu. You’ll be walking a distance of 200 m.

21. Design Museum

The Design Museum is one of the major sights on this free self-guided walking tour of Helsinki. C: Grisha Bruev/shutterstock.com

The Design Museum is another impressive Neo-Gothic edifice you’ll encounter in Helsinki. Finland is internationally famous for its cutting-edge design and the Design Museum showcases the nation’s history of industrial, fashion, and graphic design from the late 19th century to the present day.

Directions

Your next stop is Esplanadi Park (22) which lies further north on Korkeavuorenkatu. You’ll be walking a distance of 500 m.

22. Esplanadi Park

The famous Esplanadi Park is one of the must-see sights on this free self-guided Helsinki walking tour.

Esplanadi Park (or simply Espa) is an urban park in downtown Helsinki that is surrounded by the grand Esplanadi boulevard. Cafes, bistros, and upmarket boutiques dot the boulevard.

The park is not as big as some of the other parks in Helsinki but it’s a great place to relax, have a couple of drinks, or just watch the world go by. When the weather is nice there are usually some live music events in the park.

Directions

Your next stop is Havis Amanda (23). To get there, just walk through the park heading east. The statue is just outside.

23. Havis Amanda

The iconic Havis Amanda statue is one of the main attractions that you'll pass on this free self-guided Helsinki walking tour.

Havis Amanda is the most popular and iconic statue in Helsinki. The statue shows a nude mermaid leaning backward with four fish spouting water at her feet and surrounded by four sea lions.

Havis Amanda (or Manta) is regarded as a symbol of Helsinki and is the focal point of the annual Vappu (May Day) festivities.

Directions

Your next stop is the Market Square (Kauppatori) (24) which lies just adjacent to Havis Amanda.

24. Market Square

The centrally located Market Square is one of the best things to see on this free self-guided Helsinki walking tour. C: Kiev.Victor/shutterstock.com

The open-air Market Square (Kauppatori) situated at the east end of Esplanadi Park by the south harbor. It is home to numerous stalls that sell local produce and Finnish handicrafts making it a good spot to buy Finnish souvenirs.

Locals and tourists alike descend upon the Market Square on the weekends and the summer season. The Market Square is also the location of the famous Baltic Herring Market which takes place in October.

Directions

Your next stop is the Old Market Hall (25) which is easily reached by heading south on Eteläranta. You’ll be walking a distance of 150 m.

25. Old Market Hall

The Old Market Hall is one of the most notable attractions to see on this free self-guided Helsinki walking tour.

Helsinki’s Old Market Hall has been operating since 1889 and has a huge selection of traders selling all sorts of food items. The market hall offers visitors a huge variety of quality fresh food (seafood in particular) and has a very unique atmosphere.

The Old Market Hall is not just a place for tourists since many locals do their shopping here. You can also pick up canned bear, elk meat, reindeer jerky, and jams, items that could make for interesting souvenirs or gifts.

Directions

Your next stop is City Hall (26) which lies on Pohjoisesplanadi, just across the street from the Market Square. You’ll be walking a distance of 200 m.

26. City Hall

The Helsinki City Hall is one of the main sightseeing spots on this free self-guided walking tour of Helsinki.

The City Hall was designed by Carl Ludwig Engel in Neoclassical style in 1833. It served as a hotel till 1913 and hosted many important cultural premiers. Today, it is home to the office of the Mayor of Helsinki and hosts City Council meetings.

Directions

Your next stop is the Presidential Palace of Finland (27) which can be reached by heading east on Pohjoisesplanadi. You’ll be walking a distance of 150 m.

27. Presidential Palace of Finland

This free self-guided Helsinki walking tour takes you past the Presidential Palace of Finland.

The Presidential Palace is the official residence of the Finnish President. This 19th-century Neoclassical edifice is another one of Engel’s creations and you can see the similarities in its design and structure with the design of his other buildings.

Directions

Your next stop is the Old Customs House (28) which is on Kanavakatu. You’ll be walking a distance of 400 m.

28. Old Customs House

The splendid Old Customs House is one of the most beautiful sights on this free self-guided Helsinki walking tour. C: Popova Valeriya/shutterstock.com

Constructed in the early 20th century, the Old Customs House is one of the fascinating historic buildings in Helsinki.

It was designed in the National Romantic style by renowned architect Gustaf Nyström. This massive building is truly an architectural marvel and I really love its brick stonework, intricate details, and beautiful design.

The building served as a bonded warehouse until the 1960s, after which it lay abandoned for over 40 years. It is now home to some companies and is used as an exhibition area.

Directions

You’re in the Katjananokka district already but some of the more scenic streets (29) are a short stroll away. You’ll be walking a distance of 700 m.

29. Katajanokka District

This free self-guided Helsinki walking tour takes you through the affluent Katajanokka district.

Katajanokka is an upscale and atmospheric district situated on a peninsula east of the center. I am really fond of this alluring neighborhood that is rarely frequented by tourists. Similar to Ullanlinna, it’s peppered with elegant Jugendstil buildings and is like a Finnish Art Nouveau open-air museum.

Marvel at the pastel-colored walls and rich designs of the towers and windows on Laivastokatu, Luotsikatu, Kauppiaankatu, and Vyökatu.

You will be mesmerized! Look out for unique and ornate decorations on doors and rooftops. Oh, how I envy those who live there!

Directions

Your next stop is the Uspenski Cathedral (30) whose bulbous domes are easily visible from afar. You’ll be walking a distance of 800 m.

30. Uspenski Cathedral

The stunning Uspenski Cathedral is one of the highlights of this free self-guided Helsinki walking tour.

The impressive Uspenski Cathedral lies on a hillock just a stone’s throw away from the Market Square. Completed in 1868, this cathedral claims to be the largest Orthodox Church in Western Europe.

The red facade of this Eastern Orthodox cathedral is beautiful with its crosses and hulking domes. It is even more attractive from the inside with icons of saints and ornate figurines.

Admission to Uspenski Cathedral is free of charge. It is closed on Monday and during ceremonies. Opening hours are Tuesday-Friday: 09:30-16:00, Saturday: 10:00- 15:00, Sunday: 12:00-15:00.

Directions

Your next destination is the Kruununhaka district (31) which is easily reached from Uspenski Cathedral by crossing the Love Bridge. You’ll be walking a distance of 500 m.

31. Kruununhaka District

The stylish Kruununhaka district is one of the best things to see on this free self-guided Helsinki walking tour.

Kruununhaka is another elegant district in central Helsinki that is home to several important civic institutions. Being one of the oldest areas of Helsinki you’ll encounter a number of vintage shops here.

The architecture of Kruununhaka is a mixture of Neoclassical and Art Nouveau. Meritullinkatu, Mariankatu, and Rauhankatu are three streets here that rich in Art Nouveau architecture.

Directions

Your next destination is the Finnish House of Nobility (32). You’ll be walking a distance of 200 m.

32. Finnish House of Nobility

The Finnish House of Nobility is one of the important things to see on this free self-guided Helsinki walking tour.

The Neo-Gothic ‘Finnish House of Nobility’ dates back to 1862 and houses the chief assembly hall and offices for genealogy and maintenance of family records of the Finnish nobles. The building is mostly used for private events, gala dinners, and seminars. You can find information about guided tours on their website.

I’m really glad that I had the pleasure of seeing its unique interior. The coats of arms of 357 noble families embellish the walls of its main hall.

Directions

Your next destination is the Finnish National Theater (33) which lies behind the Helsinki Central Station. You’ll be walking a distance of 1 km.

33. Finnish National Theater

This free self-guided Helsinki walking tour takes you past the picturesque Finnish National Theatre. C: meunierd/shutterstock.com

The Finnish National Theater is the oldest Finnish-speaking theater in the nation, dating back to 1872 (founded in Pori).

It is an important cultural institution in Finland and even played a vital role in the Finnish push for independence. The building, completed in 1902, is yet another hallmark example of the National Romantic Style of architecture.

In my opinion, it looks more like a medieval residence or a dollhouse rather than a theater. The facade is gorgeous, with its granite walls, red roof and turrets, and detailed ornaments.

Fun Fact

The scuttlebutt around here is that the Finnish National Theater is haunted by at least three ghosts. One is a former actress dressed in white who roams the corridors in search of a script and the other two are former Finnish stage actors, one of whom is the notorious Urho Somersalmi. Somersalmi infamously hacked his wife to death with an axe that he received as a gift from the Finnish Actors’ Union and then hanged himself on a ceiling lamp hook!

Directions

Your next destination is the Ateneum Art Museum (34) which lies on Kaivokatu and is easily reached by walking across the bus stand. You’ll be walking a distance of 300 m.

34. Ateneum Art Museum

The Ateneum Art Museum is one of the must see sights on this free self-guided Helsinki walking tour. C: Sarah Marchant/shutterstock.com

The Ateneum Art Museum is home to the largest collections of classical art in Finland. The museum is home to more than 20,000 works of art, mostly by Finnish artists from the mid-18th to the mid-20th century.

Some of Finland’s most cherished artworks are located here including Hugo Simbert’s gloomily symbolic The Garden of Death and Akseli Gallen-Kallela’s Boy with a Crow. The museum building dates back to 1887 and its elegant facade is adorned with statues and reliefs which contain a lot of symbols.

Directions

Your next destination is Helsinki Central Station (35) which is just across the street.

35. Helsinki Central Station

The beautiful Helsinki Central Station is one of the best sights to see on this free self-guided Helsinki walking tour.

The last stop of this self-guided Helsinki walking tour is Helsinki Central Station, often heralded as one of the world’s most beautiful railway stations.

Completed in 1919, this pink-granite edifice is considered a masterpiece of Art Nouveau architecture in Helsinki. More than 400,000 people pass through the Helsinki Central Station daily making it Finland’s busiest building.

The giant pairs of statues of stone men that stand next to the entrance each hold a translucent lantern. They are so iconic that they have even been used as animated mascots in railroad ads!

What’s interesting is that the building incorporates striking Modernist features, such as the great portal archway and clock tower, displaying architect Eliel Saarinen’s move toward more streamlined modernism.

Fun Fact

While the Helsinki Central Station is one of the most beautiful edifices in Helsinki, the same cannot be said of the structure directly opposite to its entrance. The building in question is of course, the infamous Makkaratalo (Sausage House), which gained its unsavory nickname courtesy of the concrete sausage-shaped band encircling its exterior. Often regarded the ugliest building in Helsinki, this brutalist eyesore represents the worst of Stalinist-style architecture.

Where To Stay in Helsinki?

The best place to stay in Helsinki would be in the city center and in the vicinity. Virtually all of Helsinki’s main attractions can be found here, so it’s a perfect base for sightseeing. I have made sure to recommend only the best of the best (in terms of quality and value) 🙂

Hostel: Eurohostel, a popular choice for budget-minded travelers looking for someplace close to the city center

Budget: Omena Hotel Lönnrotinkatu, an excellent choice if you’re on the lookout for a frugal, no-frills option in central Helsinki

Mid-range: Hotel Helka, an excellent mid-range choice in central Helsinki

Splurge: Hotel Kämp, undoubtedly Helsinki’s most prestigious hotel and still the benchmark for hotel opulence

What Else to See in Helsinki

Obviously, there is plenty more to see in Helsinki than what we have covered in our walking tour. You’re in good hands as below I have compiled some of our most popular posts on how to spend the best time of your life in Helsinki and surroundings.



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Now, what do you think? Did you enjoy our self-guided walking tour of Helsinki? Are there any other stops that we should be adding? Share your thoughts with us in the comments below!

About Mihir

Hi there, I'm Mihir! I was born in India, raised there and in Australia before spending nearly a decade in Finland. I suffer from chronic fernweh and am always looking forward to a new adventure. Besides traveling, my other loves are my beloved cats, architecture, art, beer, classic movies, history, cricket, and Australian Rules Football. Oh, there's also my partner in crime Jacky who's not too bad either 😉

12 thoughts on “Free Self-Guided Helsinki Walking Tour by a Finn (with Map!)”

  1. Hi,
    Thanks for the guide, it’s brilliant! I have just spent two lovely days in Helsinki, following your guide leisurely. May I suggest two corrections, please? In the first set of directions between nn. 1 and 2 the same street name appears twice. I believe the correct version should read:

    Your next stop is the National Library of Finland (2). To get there, head north on Kluuvikatu, turn right onto (either Aleksanterinkatu or Yliopistonkatu) and turn left onto Unioninkatu. You’ll be walking a distance of 400 m.

    The second one is that in the Uspenski Cathedral they DO allow to take photos, just not with flash.

    Many thanks,
    Kirill

    1. Dear Kirill, thank you so much for your valuable feedback. I have now rectified the errors. Nice to know that they allow photographs inside Uspenski Cathedral now. Glad you had a great time in Helsinki!

      Best regards,
      Mihir

  2. This is an awesome guide! We will be in Helsinki in early Feb. Instead of walking 12km to see these sites, is it possible to rent a bicycle to travel instead? Would it be crazy to cycle in winter and in icy roads? Relatively cheap to rent a bicycle for two and with locks? It’ll be my first time to Helsinki so much appreciated for this info.

    Bernie

    1. Hi Bernie and thanks for your kind words!

      Personally, we would not recommend renting bikes in early February. This is easily the coldest period to visit Helsinki and we’re quite sure you’d be miserable exploring on bikes.

      Luckily, much of the tour can be followed on public transport as well, so we would definitely recommend that instead!

      Hope you enjoy your time in Finland! 🙂

      Jacky

  3. Claes Buurgaard-Jepsen

    Thank you Mihir for great inspiration! We are leaving for Helsinki tomorrow with lot’s to see – now even more thanks to your guide 🙂

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